Oscar Wilde said a true friend always says unpleasant things. David Brooks is a true friend of the Christian faith. He’s also one of its toughest critics. He recently shared a few of his insights into our shortcomings. They are worth considering.

Read the rest of this entry »

3D

October 13th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

Copernicus connected the dots to develop a better picture, a heliocentric system. Today’s Copernicans seek to do the same. They’re looking for meaning but not drawn to polarizing faith positions. They want both/and. They’re thinking three-dimensionally.

Read the rest of this entry »

The New Copernicans

October 6th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

In writing about revolutions of celestial orbits, Copernicus didn’t think he was starting a revolution. But he did. Research indicates Copernicus had “strategic intuition,” what religious “nones” also seem to enjoy. They might be the new Copernicans.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Stick

September 29th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

Last week I urged organizational leaders to complete their roundtables. I was dangling a carrot. There is another way to motivate – the stick. Here’s a stick, what an incomplete roundtable looks like. That’s what happened to King Arthur’s Round table.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Complete Roundtable

September 22nd, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

“Come in. I’ve been expecting you.”

Merlin’s first meeting with young Arthur explains why he would one day be indispensable to King Arthur’s Roundtable. I wrote last week how businesses benefit from having a complete roundtable. Every organization does. Here’s why.

Read the rest of this entry »

DOA

September 15th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

“… in my heart I know I’m funny.” Unfortunately, Lt. Steven Hauk was not funny. He’s clueless in Good Morning Vietnam. It’s a limitation of the left hemisphere, explaining the inability to get a joke. But it also explains the inability to craft an effective metaphor.

Read the rest of this entry »

Cogs in the Machinery

September 8th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

While the invention of the printing press did a lot of good, we often fail to recognize what it undid. Fleet Foxes might. “Helplessness Blues” captures one consequence of the printing press – a tenfold increase in unipolar depression in the Western nations.

Read the rest of this entry »

“For some reason I can’t explain, I know Saint Peter won’t call my name.” Coldplay’s Chris Martin feels like he’s “not on the list.” The lyrics of “Viva la Vida” spell this out. It’s often an unsettling feeling, but there is an upside to being on the outside.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ride My Seesaw

August 25th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

With summer winding down, it’s worth asking why America leads the world in unused vacation days – about 429 million per year. The answer might lie in half of your brain not playing seesaw.

Read the rest of this entry »

Not Very Inclusive

August 18th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

This year, almost 22 million college students will be indoctrinated in the incontestable virtues of inclusion and diversity. Problem is, most educational institutions aren’t inclusive. In fact, they’re just the opposite.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Little Judo

August 11th, 2014

Email This Post Email This Post

Judo emphasizes winning by leveraging an opponent’s weight and strength. Japanese for “the gentle way,” you exert less energy while your opponent expends most of theirs. Learning a little judo might be the way to go in the religion and science debate.

Read the rest of this entry »

Winston Churchill said democracy is the worst governing system – except for all the others. Capitalism is the most moral of a bad lot of economic systems, but only when bound to conscience. Together, conscience and capitalism steer a middle course.

Read the rest of this entry »

James Madison wrote that when a nation follows the “dictates of conscience,” a free people remain free. What then happens when conscience, a social guardrail for such things as capitalism, dissolves?

Read the rest of this entry »

According to two editors at the Economist, there have been three revolutions in Western government. They believe we’re due for a fourth. Similarly, there have been three revolutions in economics since the late 19th century. Are we due for a fourth?

Read the rest of this entry »

When did people begin to consider capitalism crooked? The idea of capitalism is as old as Genesis. Its institutions date from the early Middle Ages. They kept capitalists steering a middle course. It wasn’t until capitalism’s social guardrails dissolved that capitalism veered off course. When did that happen?

Read the rest of this entry »