Hunger Games

August 31st, 2015

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If a recent New York Times article describing Amazon’s culture is anywhere close to the truth, Amazon is not a healthy place to work. In fact, it’s more like the Hunger Games.

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We continue to debate whether dropping the atomic bombs on Japan hastened the end of the war and saved millions of lives. No one can be certain. Christians can however be confident that subsequent cultural reforms helped save 2,000,000 Japanese souls.

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The longer Kathy and I are married (34 years yesterday), the harder it is to remember being single. C. S. Lewis suggested a similar dynamic at work in heaven, reminding us why marriage is a metaphor for the gospel. But it also raises a troubling question.

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Older people occasionally lose their ability to taste food. They lose interest in eating. This is similar to what many younger folks are experiencing, but they’re not losing interest in food. They’re losing interest in the faith.

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Mounds candy bar was originally advertised as indescribably delicious. So good you had to taste it to believe it. Scripture makes a similar claim, but not about candy bars.

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Not Slow At All

July 27th, 2015

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July and August are what is known as the “slow news” season. But that might not be the case at all. Just depends on how you define slow and news.

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Amazing

July 20th, 2015

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Last month, Americans heard the strains of “Amazing Grace” as President Obama, eulogizing the victims of the Emmanuel AME Church shooting, broke into the timeless first verse. It’s amazing, but more so when you learn more about the hymn’s author, John Newton.

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Postcard People

July 13th, 2015

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“Safe places” are the new sanctuaries. They’re most prevalent on college campuses but you can find them in the faith community as well. They’re not sacred, however, as “safe places” yield postcard people.

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Neverland

July 6th, 2015

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Neverland was Peter Pan’s playground. The Scottish writer J. M. Barrie invented it as a metaphor for childishness and escapism. Neverland also depicts another invention—America as a “Christian nation.” It too is escapism.

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Thunderbolt

June 29th, 2015

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Christians are understandably upset about the Supreme Court’s ruling giving gay and lesbian couples a fundamental right to marry. President Obama called the ruling a thunderbolt. If it was, it’s a great opportunity for believers to recognize reality.

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Research indicates that people have three “awe” experiences a week on average. The benefits make us less self-centered. But for most folks, even Christians, these experiences occur more in nature than in church. Why?

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About 14 percent of Zappos’ workforce recently quit. It’s similar to what happened when Ford introduced the assembly line. Many workers abruptly resigned. Ford and Zappos remind us of why it’s sometimes wiser to be an early non-adopter.

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There’s an old adage—be careful what you wish for. You might just get it. Take the rise of the ‘religious nones.’ They might represent what evangelicals have long wished for.

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. So are interpretations of survey results apparently. Different groups often translate them in different ways. Consider how USA Today and Christianity Today interpret a recent Pew survey on religion.

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Brunello Cucinelli makes sense of business by being “a great supporter of memory.” Scripture encourages us to be advocates for remembering the right things. Cucinelli seems to, which is why the “king of cashmere” sees how business ought to be.

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