iffect

June 29th, 2007

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Staring at us.
Benedictine monks never imagined that their new technology, designed to help workers unwind, would eventually wrap workers around the axle. William Farish never imagined that his technological innovation would make his profession meaningless. New technologies are wonderful in what they promise to do, yet we are often “incapable of imagining what they will undo,” said the late Neil Postman.1 The iPhone has been described (by some) as the greatest technological innovation since the telegraph. What will it possibly undo? The answer is staring at us. Look carefully. It’s right there.

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Pit Stops

June 25th, 2007

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In the pits.
Mentoring is making a comeback in business circles. The results, however, are uneven. For thousands of years, mentors transformed protégés (butchers, bankers and candlestick makers) into professionals. In the nineteenth century, a “modern” view of business reduced mentoring to a pit stop. And therein lies the problem… and the opportunity for people of faith.

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Me And Him

June 18th, 2007

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Say What???
During halftime of the NCAA lacrosse finals, two Duke players were describing the key to successful passing and shot making. “Me and him have to have eye contact.”

Me and him?

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A pointless exercise?
The ongoing debate about the efficacy of abstinence-education programs underscores one point: we love sex. Duh. It’s important to remember this intense pleasure as we read yet another study – conducted by the Mathematica Policy Research Institute – reporting that abstinence-education programs do not delay the age when teens first have sex. News like this is cannon fodder for those who view abstinence-education as a pointless exercise. On the other hand, religious folks cite supposed flaws in the study, especially that there was a lack of “follow-up” information for teens. More information is needed?

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What do you love?
Neil Postman says students enter school as question marks and graduate as periods. This means America’s 1.3 million graduating college seniors are lightweights when it comes to raising the weightiest question as they look for work. They’re not alone. Human resource directors also overlook it. Engaged couples rarely resolve this question before marrying. It’s not often asked when joining a church or forming a business partnership. Few parents raise this question of consequence and help their kids resolve it.

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