O Holy Night

December 24th, 2007

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So hallowed and so gracious.
The midnight channel crossing was eerily silent inside the Higgins boats. Each 36×10 ft. Landing Craft Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) was pulsating to a 225 horsepower diesel engine pushing thirty-six GIs through the stormy seas. Knowing yet not knowing what awaited them at dawn, the men fell into an almost hallowed silence while the waves pounded against the plywood hulls. D-Day would come in the morning.
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Loving Darkness

December 17th, 2007

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Turn out the lights.
Richard Stevens used to wonder why there is a higher incidence of breast cancer among women in the industrialized world than in developing countries.  Then, “I literally woke up in the middle of the night – there was a street lamp outside the window, and it was so bright that I could almost read in my bedroom – and I thought, Could it be that?”1  Stevens is a cancer epidemiologist who might have discovered a link between cancer and artificial light.  The cure, however, might require the assistance of an ancient faith.

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Four corners.
Today, only 54 percent of Americans read a newspaper during the week.1   For those aged 18 to 24, the number declines to 40 percent.2   Newspaper reading is falling off.  Yet this might actually be a positive sign.  The modern news business is based on a false premise that dumbs us down.  So dumb that the British journalist Malcolm Muggeridge late in life recognized how close he came to missing the most important event there ever was. 
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Apples with Apples

December 3rd, 2007

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No room at the inn.
“Committed, engaged, ambitious, informed art does not mix with dedicated, serious, thoughtful, heartfelt religion,” says The Art Institute of Chicago’s James Elkins.1 In his new book On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art, he writes: “To fit in the art world, work with a religious theme has to demonstrate the artist has second thoughts about religion… Ambiguity and self-critique have to be integral to the work. And it follows that irony must pervade the art, must be the air it breathes.”
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