Tribute to My Dad

January 28th, 2008

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Joy wills eternity.
My father passed away this past Tuesday.  I got the news via voice mail after landing at the airport on a business trip.  My brother’s message made me feel cramped and claustrophobic in the airplane fuselage.  I wanted to crawl out the window.
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Get your motor running.

Ever wrestled with a decision or had trouble just plain remembering where you put your car keys?  What do you do?  Some people stop and pray.  That’s good.  Yet a growing body of new research suggests that pacing the floor, gesturing with our hands, and taking your car for a spin might help just as much.1  It seems that people think with their bodies not just their brains.  That’s exactly what an ancient faith tradition teaches.  Why is going for a drive often just as helpful as getting on your knees?  And why don’t we know this?

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Third Rail

January 14th, 2008

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ZZZZZZap!
No matter who wins the presidential race in November, Social Security won’t be touched. It’s the “third rail” in politics. You touch it you die. In business, you can experience a similar shock if you touch religion, says Nicholas Wolterstorff. “If the businessman, rather than being motivated by the bottom line of profit, allows his religious convictions to shape his business practices, he shortly finds himself out of business.”1 ZZZZZZap! The next time a business colleague treats faith as a third rail, tell him or her they’re only half right. In fact, tell them they’re only a third right.
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O Little Town of Nicaea.
Walls were splattered with graffiti, pamphlets inflamed passions, and lawsuits were being filed right and left. The early church was threatened with a schism over one apparently simple question: in what way is Jesus divine?1 Hoping to calm the gathering storm, the Emperor Constantine convened a council in 325 at his private lakeside palace near Nicaea. Eastern and Western bishops gathered and drafted a response that was approved at the Council of Constantinople in 381. Today the Nicene Creed is one of the most widely accepted creeds of the Christian faith. Yet the story of what happened years later at Nicaea might be just as instructive for the church today.
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