Does Monday off make you long for retirement?

As Congress wrestles with our government’s soaring debt, one entitlement program might be the easiest to fix—Social Security. Trustees project a shortfall of $3.7 trillion over the next 75 years. There are essentially two solutions being proposed. While there is merit to both, a third way—proposed by a few and consistent with Judeo-Christian faith—is worth considering.

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Prior to the 16th century, economics was considered a moral as well as a monetary discipline. The English word “credit,” for example, is from the Latin credo, “I believe.” Economists were trusted since they saw the forest for the trees. Our current models of capitalism and socialism don’t. Is there a third way to see the big picture?

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Late Boomers?

May 16th, 2011

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Are they Picassos or Cézannes?

There’s a flurry of 50ish baby boomers entering “second acts.” If they are Picassos, the second half isn’t likely to be any better than the first. If, however, they are Cézannes, these “late boomers” could make a positive contribution in the faith community.

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Point Guard

May 9th, 2011

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Ultimately, Rondo’s not the most critical player. But he is initially.

Andy Crouch suggests that our ways of talking about culture—how it works, how it changes—often do not serve us well. He’s right. Watching the NBA Playoffs might help, however. If you are a Boston Celtics fan, take note of point guard Rajon Rondo.

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What’s so bad about being bored?

‘Tis the season to be bored—end of the school year, Senior Slump, and spring fever. Everyone assumes boredom is a bad thing. Now we’re learning that being bored might have some benefits.

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