Me, Myself, & I

June 27th, 2011

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These aren’t the right witnesses.

In The Authenticity Hoax: How We Get Lost Finding Ourselves, author Andrew Potter describes how the Enlightenment created “a new kind of person” who prizes authenticity. Authenticity presents two problems, however. It relies entirely on an individual’s take on reality while rebuffing those who disagree with it.

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Me, Myself, & I

June 27th, 2011

Email This Post Email This Post

These aren’t the right witnesses.

In The Authenticity Hoax: How We Get Lost Finding Ourselves, author Andrew Potter describes how the Enlightenment created “a new kind of person” who prizes authenticity. Authenticity presents two problems, however. It relies entirely on an individual’s take on reality while rebuffing those who disagree with it.

Read the rest of this entry »

As the Tyrelle Pryor scandal drags down Ohio State’s football fortunes, a few sports pundits suggest stipends as a solution for financially strapped student-athletes. It’s a bad idea. Stipends add weight to an already big tail that’s wagging the dog.

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Con Job

June 13th, 2011

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Commencement speeches have become con jobs.

To commence is to get underway. Yet sample some of this year’s commencement addresses and you’ll see they undercut graduate’s initiative by reinforcing a sense of entitlement. Studies indicate this saps the energy required for those entering a bad job market and inheriting a ruinous federal debt.

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Clickers

June 6th, 2011

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Sixty-seven years ago today, on D-Day, American paratroopers told a parable.

Parables are designed to connect friends and confuse foes. Landing behind enemy lines, American paratroopers had one, called a clicker. It located allies yet was lost on the enemy—the same reason C.S. Lewis penned his own parable a year earlier, in 1943.

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